The Story Of Lucky- A Diamond In The Rough

Lucky’s story begins like so many other dogs who for countless reasons, end up in the shelter system. Of the dogs entering shelters, approximately 35% are adopted, 31% are euthanized and 26% of dogs who came in as strays are returned to their owner. He was one of the “Lucky” ones who was adopted, but although there was no abuse involved, his luck ended there. 

     Lucky's first "home" a small cement pen, where he lived alone for the next 18 months.

 

 Lucky's first "home" a small cement pen, where he lived alone for the next 18 months.

IMG_0129.JPG

After leaving the shelter, Lucky was brought to the place where he would live in solitude for the next 18 months. With a piece of cardboard as a bed, no visitors, and not so much as a single chew toy, Lucky had what was needed to sustain life, but he longed for someone to love. 

His luck began to change one month ago, when a landscape designer and friend of Thrive board member Georgia Spogli noticed paws reaching under the gate of one of the neighboring homes where she was working. He didn't bark or make a fuss, but would just quietly lay where he could see shadows and images. Taking an interest, she climbed the fence and looked over to find Lucky, a sweet, gentle giant. 

"Compassion is a verb." ~Thich Nhat Hahn

After reaching out to Georgia, who in turn called Thrive founder Cece Bloum, a decision was made that she would contact the people who owned Lucky. They agreed to relinquish the dog and he was brought to Thrive Animal Rescue where he has been given a second chance to have the life that we believe every dog deserves. 

"Having spent his entire puppyhood without socialization, he's only now becoming aware of his own size." One of the trainers working with Lucky observed, "He just doesn't know how to contain his love." 

    Cece Bloum working with Lucky and local dog trainer, Randy Davis of    Better By The Pound

 

Cece Bloum working with Lucky and local dog trainer, Randy Davis of Better By The Pound

Because of the generous donations of our friends and benefactors, we have the time and resources needed to help Lucky become a good family dog who will never again have to endure the stress of being abandoned into the cycle of shelter life. "We love and trust him entirely," said Cece "and we will find him the ideal home. He now has a group of people advocating for him, and we look forward to getting pictures of him this year on someone's Christmas card." 

Lucky's luck just got a whole lot better.

Please share his story with someone you know who is looking for a big bundle of love. It takes a village...

 

 

 

 

 

 

Susie Saladino